Experienced-Based Career Education (EBCE)

EBCE is an academic internship program that uses the classroom and the community to provide hands-on career exploration. By using the expertise of business people and other community resources, students also learn practical applications on a job site.

EBCE is a year-long course providing high school seniors with academic credit. All five high schools have a learning coordinator supervising the 30 to 60 seniors enrolled. Each student experiences five academic internships through the school year.

Students schedule one- to three-hour blocks (two to four days a week) for a five- to six-week period to enter the community and explore career options through direct experience. The remaining day, the student stays at school working with the learning coordinator to examine self-interests, aptitudes and career interests. Each student has an experience tailored to his interests and aptitudes.

Student goals
  • Learn about careers of interest to the student through hands-on experience
  • Develop respect for themselves as well as others
  • Improve their ability to think independently
  • Practice problem-solving strategies
  • Become active learners and cultivate a thirst for life-long learning
  • Increase awareness of technology and its place in the workplace
  • Develop ability to interact positively with adults
  • Increase awareness of each person's contribution to society
  • Improve communication and team-building skills
Application process

High school juniors may check with their school's EBCE coordinator for details. Those accepted into the program sign up for EBCE as an elective class in their senior year.

To be considered, students must maintain a successful academic and attendance record, interview with the school's EBCE learning coordinator, and present referrals from teachers that assure the student is mature and responsible.

For current EBCE students

 

About this page

  • For questions: Nick Runyon
  • To report a broken link or other website issues: Tammy Lane
  • Updated: July 29, 2015